CMS Modifies Bundled Pay Requirements

dg-bundled-paymentsWhile hospitals in 34 geographic areas will still be required to participate in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model, hundreds of acute care hospitals in other areas have received a reprieve. In addition to modifying CJR model compliance, CMS recently finalized plans to cancel the Episode Payment and Cardiac Rehabilitation Incentive Payment Models, both of which were scheduled to become effective on January 1, 2018.

While a number of hospitals will voluntarily participate in the CJR model and others have expressed interest to participate in the two cancelled models, the agency said there would not be enough time to restructure the models prior to the planned 2018 start date. Even though some have criticized the Trump administration for a lack of interest in value-based care, the administration has expressed a strong commitment to value-based payment, but says it prefers voluntary models.

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Want to tackle rising health costs? Consider self-funding ancillary lines

This article was published on February 05, 2018 on Employee Benefit News, written by Liisa Granfors-Hunt.

If your medical plan is fully insured, switching to self-funding (and covering catastrophic claims) can be downright intimidating, even with stop-loss insurance. That’s why many employers are sticking a toe in the financial risk pool by self-funding one or two ancillary lines of coverage.

The most commonly self-funded ancillary benefits are dental and short-term disability, followed by vision. These benefits are relatively low risk: Chances are, your employees don’t typically use dental services much beyond bi-annual checkups and a filling here and there. Short-term disability is a popular benefit for employees needing maternity leave. However, if you plan accordingly, these claims won’t drastically affect the benefit spend.

Self-funding can save money and provide a greater level of transparency into how a benefits plan is performing. Here’s where you can save money: When insurance companies price products, they determine the premium by reviewing actuarial data, setting aside a portion to pay current claims, reserves to pay future claims, plus a profit. Why let the insurance company hold your reserves? By self-funding, employers hold that money.

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Photo Source: Employee Benefit News

If you’re interested in trying self-funding for dental or short-term disability coverages, you’ll need some claims data to work with. When you self-fund a benefit such as dental care, an underwriter will review your claims history, taking into account the number of people covered under the plan, and determine what your expected claims will be based on past data and future trends. You’ll set a budget that includes your fee for plan administration, based and your expected claims. We don’t recommend self-funding the benefit the first year you offer it.

What to consider

When self-funding short term disability, depending on your comfort level, there are varying levels of help to administer the plan. Third-party administrators can handle the full range of managing a self-funded plan, such as adjudicating the claim, calculating the amount to pay and actually paying the claim. This takes some of the pressure off of plan sponsors who are completely new to self-funding, but, as with anything that conveys value, TPAs come at a cost. Therefore, you may choose to handle most of this responsibility yourself, including calculating the benefit and drawing the check. But before you make that decision, assess the availability and knowledge of your internal resources.

For both dental and short term disability, compliance is key. Depending on how your plan is structured, you may be responsible for complying with state and federal regulations that your carrier handled previously. When setting up your plan, it’s vital to ensure that you understand where responsibilities lie so you can remain compliant.

Risk should be your primary concern. Sure, this may seem obvious — for ancillary benefits such as dental and short-term disability, the risk is relatively low. Self-funding an insurance benefit means you should watch how the plan is performing more closely than you would if it were fully insured.

One example of potential savings

For companies who weigh the risk and begin self-funding dental, the savings can be very real. One company offered an employer paid dental plan to its 420 eligible employees. The plan averaged 394 enrolled members over 18 months. During that same 18-month period, the employer paid $567,474 in premiums. The insurance company paid $481,617 in dental claims, equaling a difference of $85,857. Even after adding a $4.50 per employee per month administration fee to the claims cost, the employer would have saved nearly $54,000, or 9.5% of the total cost.

Medical costs continue to rise steeply; self-funding some of your ancillary cove rages can give you greater insight into how your program is performing and help you save money.

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Empowering Employees: Big Talk, Little Action

dg-empoweringTelemedicine offers a lot of potential for everyone – added convenience for busy families and lower costs than a traditional office visit. But as helpful as this service can be, it will only make a difference if it is used.

Low utilization is not unique to telemedicine. It’s a common problem with many new, well designed and well-intended health care services. Encouraging plan members to actually use new offerings is a challenge for employer groups, large and small. And while utilization is often higher in self-funded health plans, all employers need help turning talk into action. Here are a few ideas to consider:

It’s all about them – With health care consuming more of everyone’s income and attention, we all have a vested interest in our benefits. And while wonderful tools like telemedicine keep coming to the table, you need to look at these offerings from your member’s perspective rather than your own. Talk with your employees; ask if a service will help them and listen to their feedback. If it can add real value to your employee’s lives, utilization will follow.

Talk about health, not cost – Research indicates that when it comes to their health and well-being, there are many things members would prefer to hear about than fees and costs. A majority are interested in improving their health. It takes time, but focusing on current health risks and personalizing communications as much as possible will help members want to get more engaged.

Educate to empower – Transparency tools and online portals are no different than other modern advances. If people don’t understand them, they will never catch on. Like telemedicine, unless employees understand how to use it and when they can use it, they will never realize the benefit of having an experienced, board certified physician, with access to their medical records, available to help them 24/7.

While it seems that other new disruptive innovations, such as Alexa, catch fire overnight, they do take time. Since your employee communication budget likely pales in comparison to those driving consumers to Amazon, talk with your TPA about new ways to zero in on the needs of your employees. Doing so can lead to increased utilization and a happier, healthier workforce in 2018 and beyond.

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Does Your Organization Offer an On-Site Fitness Center? Here’s Why It Should!

Worksite wellness programs are becoming more popular these days, as companies increase their efforts to attract and keep top talent. A recent article in Employee Benefit News discussed reasons why companies are even starting to take worksite wellness one step further by offering on-site fitness centers.

This is a perk that all of us here at Diversified are fortunate to be able to utilize and enjoy! Our offices include a fitness room that offers yoga, spin classes, toning classes and more to all of our employees. Why do we think this is such a necessary benefit? The Diversified Group family of companies includes Corporate Fitness & Health (CF&H), our wellness consulting and services company, who believes that employee health is an investment. And, they know that when a company crafts and offers the right wellness program it can truly improve the overall health and productivity of its workforce.

Learn more about CF&H here! And, to learn the reasons why on-site fitness centers are becoming increasingly popular, read the full Employee Benefit News article below.

3 reasons employers are offering on-site fitness centers

This article was published on January 31, 2018 on Employee Benefit News, written by Ann Wyatt.

It’s no secret that employers are in a constant struggle for top talent. And, it’s only going to get tougher in the future. Current government statistics tell us the U.S. employment rate was 4.2% in September. That’s down by more than half of its peak of 10.2% in October 2009. At the same time, a large portion of the workforce will be retiring in the next 15 years. By 2030, every baby boomer will be 65-plus, which means a full 18% of the U.S. population will be at retirement age. That’s a lot of retirees — and a lot of jobs left to fill.

Essentially, there just aren’t going to be enough good people to fill all the open roles in the next 10-15 years. And that’s a serious problem for today’s modern business — one companies need to address. That’s why many organizations are offering up a slew of unique and useful employee benefits to attract and retain the best employees.

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Photo Source: BenefitNews.com

Among those offerings are on-site fitness centers. Why are on-site fitness centers an increasingly popular employee perk? Three reasons come to mind.

1. Employees want a more personal touch. According to research, a vast majority of employees say a personal touch is important in their health, well-being and fitness program. That means employees are seeking access to “live experts” who are credible, engaging, easy to access and provide one-on-one support for their specific needs. Corporate fitness centers meet this need directly by offering up a physical space where employees can work with these coaches and fitness consultants to develop individualized plans to meet their unique health needs.

2. Convenience is everything. Nearly half of employees who are offered on-site fitness facility access chose to participate largely due to their convenience, inviting environment and low- or no-cost membership. After all, it’s a lot easier to get a workout in if you only have to travel two floors down on the elevator versus 10 miles in rush-hour traffic. Convenience counts for a lot with employees.

3. They help employees’ increasing need to manage stress. Employees are under more stress than ever before. The World Health Organization recently called stress the health epidemic of the 21st century. And, it’s costing employers significantly. One recent study found that work-related stress costs U.S. businesses $30 billion a year in lost workdays (some estimate it at $300 billion). On-site fitness centers can not only help employees better manage stress with a host of programs but they can also help employers make a dent in those lost productivity costs above.

Corporate Fitness & Health

Unnecessary Medical Care: More Common Than You Might Imagine

This article was published on February 1, 2018 on National Public Radio, Inc, written by Marshall Allen.

Photo Source: NPR, Inc.

It’s one of the intractable financial boondoggles of the U.S. health care system: Lots and lots of patients get lots and lots of tests and procedures that they don’t need.

Women still get annual cervical cancer testing even when it’s recommended every three to five years for most women. Healthy patients are subjected to slates of unnecessary lab work before elective procedures. Doctors routinely order annual electrocardiograms and other heart tests for people who don’t need them.

That all adds up to substantial expense that drives up the cost of care for all of us. Just how much, though, is seldom tallied. So, the Washington Health Alliance, a nonprofit dedicated to making care safer and more affordable, decided to find out.

The group scoured the insurance claims from 1.3 million patients in Washington state who received one of 47 tests or services that medical experts have flagged as overused or unnecessary.

What the group found should cause both doctors, and their patients, to rethink that next referral. In a single year:

  • More than 600,000 patients underwent a treatment they didn’t need, treatments that collectively cost an estimated $282 million.
  • More than a third of the money spent on the 47 tests or services went to unnecessary care.
  • 3 in 4 annual cervical cancer screenings were performed on women who had adequate prior screenings – at a cost of $19 million.
  • About 85 percent of the lab tests to prep healthy patients for low-risk surgery were unnecessary — squandering about $86 million.
  • Needless annual heart tests on low-risk patients consumed $40 million.

Susie Dade, deputy director of the alliance and primary author of the report released Thursday, said almost half the care examined was wasteful. Much of it comprised the sort of low-cost, ubiquitous tests and treatments that don’t garner a second look. But “little things add up,” she said. “It’s easy for a single doctor and patient to say, ‘Why not do this test? What difference does it make?'”

ProPublica has spent the past year examining how the American health care system squanders money, often in ways that are overlooked by providers and patients alike. The waste is widespread – estimated at $765 billion a year by the National Academy of Medicine, about a fourth of all the money spent each year on health care.

The waste contributes to health care costs that have outpaced inflation for decades, making patients and employers desperate for relief. This week Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase rattled the industry by pledging to create their own venture to lower their health care costs.

Wasted spending isn’t hard to find once researchers — and reporters — look for it. An analysis in Virginia identified $586 million in wasted spending in a single year. Minnesota looked at fewer treatments and found about $55 million in unnecessary spending.

Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, a professor at The Dartmouth Institute who writes books about overuse, said the findings come back to “Economics 101.” The medical system is still dominated by a payment system that pays providers for doing tests and procedures. “Incentives matter,” Welch said. “As long as people are paid more to do more they will tend to do too much.”

Dade said the medical community’s pledge to “do no harm” should also cover saddling patients with medical bills they can’t pay. “Doing things that are unnecessary and then sending patients big bills is financial harm,” she said.

Officials from Washington’s hospital and medical associations didn’t quibble with the alliance’s findings, calling them an important step in reducing the money wasted by the medical system. But they said patients bear some responsibility for wasteful treatment. Patients often insist that a medical provider “do something,” like write a prescription or perform a test. That mindset has contributed to problems like the overuse of antibiotics — one of the items examined in the study.

The report may help change assumptions made by providers and patients that lead to unnecessary care, said Jennifer Graves, vice president for patient safety at the Washington State Hospital Association. Often a prescription or technology isn’t going to provide a simple cure, Graves said. “Watching and waiting” might be a better approach, she said.

To identify waste, the alliance study ran commercial insurance claims through a software tool called the Milliman MedInsight Health Waste Calculator. The services were provided during a one-year period starting in mid-2015. The claims were for tests and treatments identified as frequently overused by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation’s Choosing Wisely campaign. The tool categorized the services one of three ways: necessary, likely wasteful or wasteful.

The report’s “call to action” said overuse must become a focus of “honest discussions” about the value of health care. It also said the system needs to transition from paying for the volume of services to paying for the value of what’s provided.

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Maybe You Should Eat Earlier

eat-earlierThe old saying “timing is everything” may even apply to when you eat your meals, according to Michael Pollan, author of In Defense of Food. Skipping breakfast or having an occasional late dinner is fine, but sticking to an earlier eating schedule may contribute to healthier living by helping you maintain a healthy weight. Findings were based on a small study implemented over an 8-week period in which adults had three meals and two snacks between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m., followed by a two week break and eight weeks of a later schedule, which included three meals and two snacks eaten between noon and 11 p.m.

The later eating schedule resulted in weight gain and a negative impact on insulin levels, cholesterol and fat metabolism. The study also showed that when people ate earlier, they stayed satisfied longer, which helped them prevent overeating. Given our hectic schedules, eating later occasionally is hard to avoid. But it will help if you can make an effort to get back to an earlier schedule.

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Is It Time to Self-Fund Your Benefit Plans?

After reading the article included below, we couldn’t help but agree that the question every employer should be asking this year is…Should I self-fund my employee benefit plan?

As the article discusses, this is a great time of year for companies to review their status, evaluate changes that have been made and consider new items for their 2018 benefit to-do list. The article includes 8 questions benefits managers should be asking themselves this year. But, we’d like to help you address one key question – Is Self-Funding Right for You or Your Client?

Whether you’ve been asking this question for some time or you’re new to the concept of self-funding, we’d be happy to explain the flexibility and potential for savings that a self-insured plan can offer. Gain control over your group health plan, eliminate the high costs of insurance premiums and obtain access to monthly claim reports – all with help from Diversified Group!

8 benefit management items to evaluate in 2018

This article was published on January 24, 2018 on Employee Benefit News, written by Zack Pace

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Even 20 years into the benefits business, I still can’t always immediately remember details about my clients’ benefits plan — a given employer’s standard measurement period, affordability safe harbor or health savings account trustee, for example. That’s why I track all of these details across 32 columns in a simple spreadsheet.

While I use this reference tool most every day, I find that January is a great month to go even further with the employers I work with, carefully reviewing each company, considering how the employer’s circumstances have changed, and proposing items of consideration for our mutual 2018 benefit to-do list.

Employers are wise to have a similar benefit to-do list when it comes to their 2018 planning process. Here are eight common questions that benefits managers may find wise to ask.

1. For calendar year 2018, is your organization a “large employer” subject to ACA employer shared responsibility? Meanwhile, is your organization a “large employer” per your state’s fully insured group health plan market?

Generally, employers that averaged 50 or more full-time employees + full-time equivalents in calendar year 2017 are subject to ACA shared responsibility for all of calendar year 2018. Importantly, penalty risks generally now begin accruing in January, not when the plan year begins (if the date differs).

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However, confusingly, in most states, the threshold to be considered a large employer for group health insurance contracts is an average of 51 or more full-time employee + full-time equivalents in the previous calendar year. How do the rules work in your state?

Now’s the time to finalize your 2017 calculation and determine your 2018 status for both employer shared responsibility and your state’s group health insurance market. And, yes, I’ve seen several employers average exactly 50 and be deemed a large employer regarding ACA employer shared responsibility and a small employer in reference to their fully insured group health plan contract. Talk about bad luck.

2. Is it time to self-fund the group medical plan?

The financial headwinds faced by fully insured plans have never been greater. Fully insured premiums are laden with the roughly 4% ACA premium tax (aka the Health Insurer Annual Fee), state premium taxes, the cost of various state-mandated benefits, and often robust retention and pooling point charges.

Thus, employers sponsoring group fully insured health plans should consider if moving to a self-funded contract (including so-called level-funding contracts) could be advantageous. Given the varying state regulations, state stop-loss minimums, organizational risk tolerance, reserve requirements and other variables, there is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. Especially good times to perform a comprehensive self-funding evaluation are when your company crosses over from small group to large group and/or when meaningful claims experience becomes available from your fully insured vendor.

3. Is it time to self-fund the dental and short-term disability plans?

For most employers of size sponsoring plans that are not 100% employee paid (aka not voluntary), the answer to this question is simply “yes.” Run the math and make your decision.

4. Does benefit eligibility for life and disability vary by class?

For start-up companies, it’s not uncommon to offer better group life and disability benefits to certain classes, including management and executives. However, as employers grow, the budgetary and cultural reasons for doing so can quickly diminish or go away. A quick litmus test is simply asking yourself if the continuing benefit discrimination still makes sense.

Regardless if these benefits vary by class, is your group life plan compliant with the Section 79 nondiscrimination rules? Double-check with your attorney, accountant and benefits consultant.

5. Who is the health savings account trustee (i.e., the bank)? Is it linked to the health insurer?

If your organization sponsors a qualified high-deductible health plan, you likely allow employees to contribute to an HSA pre-tax through your Section 125 plan. Is the bank you selected still the best fit? Is the bank tied to your fully insured group health vendor? If yes, if you change your group health vendor, are your employees allowed to maintain the HSAs with this trustee with no fee changes? Should you consider moving to a quality stand-alone HSA vendor?

6. Does your firm employ anyone in California, Hawaii, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island or Puerto Rico?

Most employers headquartered in these states (and territory) are acutely aware of the state disability requirements. However, given the advent of liberal telecommuting policies, it’s becoming more common for employers without physical locations in these states to employ individuals in these states. If you answered yes to this question, double-check your compliance with the state disability requirements. Your disability insurer or administrator can assist.

And, please note that, just this month (January 2018), New York became the latest state/jurisdiction to require paid family leave.

7. For firms offering retiree health plan benefits, are benefits for Medicare-eligible retirees and spouses self-funded?

While retiree health benefits have generally gone the way of the American chestnut tree, these benefits remain fairly common among certain sectors, such as higher education, government and certain nonprofits. Historically, most employers simply allowed Medicare-eligible retirees to remain on the employer’s active health plan, with the employer’s plan paying secondary to Medicare for Part A and Part B expenses and primary for prescription drug costs.

This arrangement was just fine when a really high annual prescription claim was $15,000. Now, $90,000 claims are not uncommon and $225,000 claims are possible. Does it still make sense to self-fund this retiree risk? In states where it is permissible, would it be prudent to transfer the risk by adopting a fully insured group Medicare Advantage plan or supplement program?

Regardless, all employers self-funding retiree health benefits should double-check that their individual stop-loss policy includes retirees.

And, regardless if retiree benefits are offered, all employers sponsoring self-funded health benefits should double-check that their individual stop-loss policy covers prescription drugs.

8. Is your firm required to file health and welfare Form 5550s? If so, who is handling the filings?

Generally, employers subject to ERISA that sponsor benefit plans that, at the beginning of the plan year, cover 100 or more participants, are required to file health and welfare 5500s and the related schedules. Some smaller employers must also file. Most multiple employer welfare arrangements (MEWAs) must file.

It’s very easy for health and welfare Form 5500 filing requirements to fall through the cracks. While U.S. Treasury’s penalties for non-filers are substantial, Treasury doesn’t keep track of who is required to file and thus doesn’t individually remind employers of this requirement. Further, this requirement doesn’t seem to be on the checklist of most auditors and accountants.

Employers should review all enrollment counts of all plans at the beginning of each year and consult with their accountant, attorney, and benefits consultant on the filing requirement and next steps.

I recommend avoiding the shortcut of saying “5500” in these discussions. Always say “the health and welfare 5500.” This practice will mitigate the risk that someone hears “5500” and thinks retirement plan 5500.

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