IRS Releases Adjusted PCOR Fee

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund fee is a fee on issuers of health insurance policies and plan sponsors of self-insured health plans that helps to fund the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), which was established by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The institute assists, through research, patients, clinicians, purchasers and policy-makers, in making health decisions by advancing the quality of evidence-based medicine. The institute compiles and distributes comparative clinical effectiveness research findings. Under the ACA, all medical plans are responsible for paying the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research fee to the IRS, based on the number of plan participants. If the plan is fully-insured, the insurance carrier pays the fee on behalf of the policyholder. If the plan is self-insured, the employer/plan sponsor must file the Form 720 for the second quarter and pay the fee to the IRS directly.

The IRS recently published its PCOR fee for policy and plan years ending:  January through September 2018 the applicable dollar amount is $2.39, which is multiplied by the number of covered lives determined for the appropriate period. For policy and plan years ending October through December 2018, the applicable dollar amount is $2.45.

All self-insured medical plans, including health FSAs and HRAs must pay the fee unless they are considered an excepted-benefit:

  • A health FSA is an excepted-benefit as long as the employer does not contribute more than $500/year to the accounts and offers another medical plan with non-excepted benefits.
  • An HRA is an excepted-benefit if it only reimburses for excepted-benefits (e.g., limited-scope dental and vision expenses or long-term care coverage) and is not integrated with the group medical plan.

The PCORI fee is calculated off the average number of lives covered during the policy year. That means that all parties enrolled will have to be accounted for such as dependents, spouses, retirees, and COBRA beneficiaries. For HRA and health FSA plans, just count each participating employee as a covered life.

Payment of the PCOR fee for the calendar 2018 plan year — the last year the fee applies — will be due by July 31, 2019 (payments may extend into 2020 for non-calendar-year plans).

Clients who have elected to have Diversified Group assist with the PCOR fee calculation can expect an email in June 2019, which will include a copy of the completed Form 720 and a PCOR calculation worksheet with supporting documentation. Clients will need to file the Form 720 by July 31, 2019.

why-diversified-group

Maine is Reinstituting the Per Member Per Month Assessment to Fund the Maine Guaranteed Access Reinsurance Program

Section 1332 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) permits a state to apply for a State Innovation Waiver to pursue innovative strategies for providing their residents with access to high quality, affordable health insurance while retaining the basic protections of the ACA. Recently several states have applied for waivers and have been approved. Among these is the State of Maine, which sought to reestablish the Maine Guaranteed Access Reinsurance Association – MGARA (originally established in 2012 but later suspended in light of the ACA’s transitional reinsurance program which expired in 2016). Maine’s Section 1332 waiver to reestablish MGARA was approved by the Department of Health and Human Services earlier this year. MGARA is a state instituted reinsurance program that automatically cedes high-risk enrollees with one of eight conditions (including various types of cancer, congestive heart failure, HIV and rheumatoid arthritis) and voluntary cedes other high-risk enrollees to the pool in an attempt to help stabilize individual medical premiums by about 9 percent each year beginning in 2019. The program is slated to initially run from January, 2019 through December, 2023. The Governor’s Office pushed to get the program up and running by January, 2019 in an attempt to substantially lower premiums in the individual market.

One of the funding sources supporting MGARA’s operations is a quarterly assessment due from each insured and self-insured plan that writes or otherwise provides medical insurance in Maine (other than federal or state government plans) beginning in 2019 at $4.00 per month for each covered person enrolled under each such policy or plan. Only federal and state employees are exempt from the assessment. The 2019 Quarterly Assessment will apply to policies and plans initiated or renewed on or after January 1, 2019, with the first assessment due on May 15, 2019, and 45 days from the end of each calendar quarter thereafter. Self-funded plans using a Third Party Administrator (TPA) will be assessed and reported through their TPA similar to other state assessments.

Diversified Group will collect and report the MGARA on behalf of our self-insured clients who have members residing in Maine.

why-diversified-group

House Passes Two Bills to Expand HSA Coverage

United States Capitol Building

Yesterday, the House passed two bills that would expand HSA coverage:

The Restoring Access to Medication and Modernizing Health Savings Accounts Act of 2018 (HR 6199)

This Act would:

  • Allow plans flexibility in providing first dollar coverage up to $250 for a single and $500 for a family for additional services, such as those related to treatment of chronic conditions and telehealth services.
  • It would also make certain OTC drugs a qualified medical expense.
  • Allow HSA funds to pay for direct primary care up to $150 per month for an individual and $300 per month for a family.
  • Expand HSAs to allow physical activity, fitness and exercise related services (i.e., gym memberships, sports equipment) to be qualified medical expenses (up to $500 for an individual and $1,000 for a family).
  • It would also loosen some of the contribution restrictions on spouses who have a flexible spending account (FSA) at their employer.
  • Allow employees, at the employer’s discretion, to convert their FSA and HRA balances into an HSA contribution upon enrolling in a high deductible health plan with an HSA. The conversion amount is capped at $2,650 for an individual and $5,300 for family coverage.

Increasing Access to Lower Premium Plans and Expanding Health Savings Accounts Act of 2018 (HR 6311)

This Act would:

  • Increase the maximum contribution to health savings accounts (HSAs) to $6,650 for an individual and $13,300 for a family.
  • Allow both spouses to make catch-up contributions to the same health savings account. Under current law, if both spouses are HSA-eligible and age 55 or older, they must open separate HSA accounts for their respective “catch-up” contributions.  This provision would allow both spouses to deposit their catch-up contributions into one account.
  • Allow working seniors enrolled in Medicare Part A to contribute to an HSA.
  • Allow individuals in a bronze or catastrophic health plan to contribute to an HSA.
  • Allow balances on flexible savings accounts to be carried over.
  • Allow HSAs opened within 60 days after gaining coverage under a HDHP as having been opened on the same day as the HDHP. This would give a grace period between the time coverage begins through an HDHP and the establishment of an HSA.  Currently, HSA funds can only be used for qualified expenses after the HSA has been established.
  • It would also delay the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance tax for another two years to 2021.

There are a handful of other healthcare related bills yet to be taken up by the House. It is unclear if they will act prior to the August break (beginning July 30th). Both of the above Acts will most likely be taken up by the Senate after the break.

Diversified Group will be following the progress of these bills closely and will provide updates as they are received.

why-diversified-group

Association Health Plans Final Rules Released

On June 19, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor released the final rule on Association Health Plans (AHPs). The rule seeks to expand health coverage among small employer groups and self-employed individuals. It will make it easier for small business to join together to purchase health insurance without the myriad of regulations individual states and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) imposes on smaller fully insured employers. AHPs are not required to provide the essential health benefits (EHBs) package included in the ACA. The plans have been intended to provide less expensive options for small businesses, regional collectives, and industry groups that may not be able to purchase insurance through the public exchanges.

The rule broadens the definition of an employer under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), to allow more groups to form association health plans and bypass rules under the Affordable Care Act. ERISA is the federal law that governs health benefits and retirement plans offered by large employers. Below is a comparison of the original proposed rule and the final rule just released.

association-health-plan-chart
The final rules confirm that self-insured Association Health Plans are considered Multiple Employer Welfare Arrangements (MEWAs) and does not curtail a state’s ability to regulate self-insured AHPs. This means that self-insured AHPs will be subject to MEWA laws in each state where coverage is offered/where members are located. Self-insured AHPs will have to follow the MEWA rules of the state with the most restrictive rule on an issue by issue basis. The final rule did leave an opening for future self-insured AHPs with the following language on page 96 of the 198 page regulation: “a potential future mechanism for preempting State insurance laws that go too far in regulating self-insured AHPs…” But for now, there is not anything in the final regulation designed to help self-insured AHPs thrive.

why-diversified-group

ACA Affordability Percentage for 2019

On May 21, 2018, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued Revenue Procedure 2018-34 which indexes the contribution percentages for 2019 for purposes of determining affordability of an employer’s plan under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  For plan years beginning in 2019, employer-sponsored coverage will be considered affordable if the employee’s required contribution for self-only coverage does not exceed 9.86 percent of the employee’s household income for the year for purposes of the employer shared responsibility rules. This is an increase from the 2018 affordability threshold percentage of 9.56%. The 2019 increase in the affordability percentage for employer shared responsibility purposes means that employers will be able to charge employees a slightly higher price for their health benefits and still  meet the “affordability” test.

Since an employer would not know an employee’s household income, IRS Notice 2015-87 confirmed that ALEs using an affordability safe harbor may rely on the adjusted affordability contribution percentages if they use one of three affordability safe harbor methods. The three safe harbors to measure affordability are Form W-2 wages from that employer, the employee’s rate of pay or the federal poverty line (FPL) for a single individual. The affordability test applies only to the portion of the annual premiums for self-only coverage and does not include any additional cost for family coverage. Also, if an employer offers multiple health coverage options, the affordability test applies to the lowest-cost option that also satisfies the minimum value requirement.

Below is an example of how the percentage change impacts an employer’s monthly affordable amount using the three safe harbor tests.  The example assumes an employee earns $10/hour.

Safe Harbor

$10 / hour

2018

2019

W-2 Income

$165.71

$170.91

Rate of Pay

$124.28

$128.18

Federal Poverty Line*

$96.72

$99.75

*Based on Jan. 2018 FPL of $12,140

Under the ACA, employees (and their family members) who are eligible for coverage under an affordable employer-sponsored plan are generally not eligible for the premium tax credit from the Exchange. This is significant because the ACA’s employer shared responsibility penalty for applicable large employers (ALEs) is triggered when a full-time employee receives a premium tax credit for coverage under an Exchange.

why-diversified-group

Commonsense Reporting Bill Introduced

dg-commonsense-reportingIn October, a bipartisan group of senators introduced a bill that would ease the ACA reporting mandates for employer-sponsored health plans. The bill would roll back the reporting requirements of Section 6056 and replace them with a voluntary reporting system. The bill would also allow payers to transmit employee notices electronically rather than having to send paper statements by mail.

While self-funded health plans must now comply with Sections 6055 and 6056, it is not yet clear how the bill would affect Section 6055 requirements. Senators Rob Portman of Ohio and Mark Warner of Virginia, sponsors of the bill, say their proposal would give the government a more effective way of applying premium tax credits to consumers who purchase insurance through an Exchange, something the administration has been trying to accomplish.

why-diversified-group

ACA Mandate Penalty Eliminated

The ACA has required people to have what the government has classified as minimum essential coverage, or else pay a penalty which now amounts to 2.5% of modified adjusted gross income over the income tax filing threshold.

While the House version of tax reform did not change the penalty in any way, the Senate version cut the penalty to 0% and in joint conference debates, the reduction was kept in the bill that was just passed by both houses. The Senate provision is not a repeal of the penalty, but instead a reduction, which could be increased by Congress in the future. While lower corporate and personal tax rates will take effect this year, this reduction will not become effective until 2019.

why-diversified-group