Debunking Three Myths About Reference-Based Pricing

This article was published on May 9, 2018 on BenefitsPro, written by Steve Kelly, co-founder and CEO of ELAP Services. Photo Credit: BenefitsPro.

The most successful business owners and employers surround themselves with advisers who are experts in their field and can guide companies on making sound business decisions. In an industry as complex as health care, brokers are relied on as trusted counsel when it comes to choosing the best benefit options. For brokers to serve as a knowledgeable authority and stay relevant in today’s diverse benefits marketplace, they must be educated on the facts.

Reference-based pricing, also known as metric-based pricing, is a topic that is sometimes misrepresented or misunderstood in the broker community. Astute benefits professionals recognize that reference-based pricing is a viable cost-containment opportunity, and there are good reasons why it’s growing in popularity for self-funded employers. After all, when was the last time brokers could offer employers a solution with the potential to save up to 30 percent on their total health care spend?

Guiding clients in new territory

Significant savings aside, some business owners may be uncomfortable with the idea of leaving the familiar insurance atmosphere behind. This is when brokers can exhibit their expertise and help their clients adequately plan for and address potential risks. Brokers can also rely on experienced partners to assist with the design of a health plan that makes the most sense for their clients.

Being engaged and informed enables brokers to encourage clients to push past their initial discomfort and fully understand the value of reference-based pricing. Here are some common myths that surround this type of health plan.

Myth 1: Balance billing only occurs on plans with reference-based pricing.

One of the most common myths about reference-based pricing is that clients who utilize the solution will put their members at financial risk because of balance billing. In today’s health care landscape, more Americans are struggling with medical expenses. Among Americans ages 65 and younger who have insurance, 20 percent said they had problems paying medical bills within the past year. In addition, out-of-network providers and specialists are operating at in-network facilities, and this results in unexpected balance bills.

Balance billing, and variations of that practice, is actually quite common and not limited to reference-based pricing plans. According to a new national survey of 2,200 adult U.S. residents by the Consumer Reports National Research Center, nearly one-third of privately insured Americans received a surprise medical bill in the past two years where their health plan paid less than expected.

If a broker selects a proficient and experienced reference-based pricing partner, the likelihood of balance billing is reduced because the solution is focused on fair payment to medical providers. In the instance when a reimbursement is not accepted, the right partner will provide a strong member advocacy program that backs members, advocates for their best interests, and drives toward fair and agreed-upon outcomes for all parties.

Myth 2: Providers will deny care to patients who have reference-based pricing plans.

First and foremost, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA) prohibits medical facilities from denying care to any patient in an emergency. In non-emergency situations, companies that utilize reference-based pricing and provide a reasonable reimbursement with a fair profit margin to medical facilities find that the vast majority accept the payment. On rare occasions where access is denied, experienced reference-based partners can negotiate a resolution for that specific episode of care.

Partnering with a reference-based pricing solution that includes line-by-line, in-depth auditing for each medical service is another way brokers can be confident that medical facilities will be compensated fairly and promptly. A quality provider of reference-based pricing solutions will also guide brokers appropriately regarding client fit and regional market conditions. The existence of collaborative relationships with area health systems is another indicator of a reference-based pricing partner that is doing their due diligence to prioritize fair provider reimbursement and minimize push back.

Myth 3: Employers using reference-based pricing will end up battling hospitals.

It’s worth repeating that the vast majority of medical providers will accept adjusted payments that are calculated using valid metrics to determine fair reimbursement amounts. If a facility does not accept a reference-based payment, there are many steps before the situation escalates to legal action.

In fact, sitting down and speaking with a medical facility can help lead to positive resolutions for everyone involved. When community businesses and hospital systems come to the table, there are significant advantages for both the health systems and the employers. Working together to find solutions creates the opportunity for a positive ripple effect of benefits.

If a resolution cannot be reached, it is important that brokers and employers are partnered with a reference-based pricing solutions provider with a strong patient advocacy sector. A quality solution provider will assure that members and employers are protected against unfair billing, collections and potential litigation.

Grow your business with reference-based pricing

With the correct information and tools to reduce risk, brokers can guide well-suited clients to utilize reference-based pricing as a tool to reduce health care spend, which can help business owners and employers transform their business. Offering reference-based pricing as a solution can help brokers remain in the center of the health care benefits discussion and help them to grow their business, attract new clients and retain current clients.

Being knowledgeable about reference-based pricing gives brokers an opportunity to showcase their expertise to clients, and choosing a proven partner enables them to offer a viable solution with significant cost savings.

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Reference-based pricing: where do carriers go from here?

This article was published May 10, 2018 on BenefitsPro.com, written by Alex Tolbert.

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Photo Source: BenefitsPro

Back in 2015, the big topic in health care was insurance company consolidation. This was the year Anthem announced plans to acquire Cigna, and Aetna put out a bid for Humana.

Mergers across four of the country’s biggest insurers would have significantly reshaped the U.S. insurance landscape, and not everyone thought it was a good idea. There were concerns that consolidation would lead to rising costs for consumers. In fact, CEO of electronic medical record company athenahealth, Jonathan Bush, had this to say to CNBC about the potential deals:

“These [mergers] are what happen when industries essentially die. Hopefully what will happen is there will be disruptive innovation and the role of the traditional health insurance company will be obsolete.”

Here in 2018, we know neither of these mergers took place, after facing antitrust scrutiny from the Department of Justice. But even though the mergers fell through, Bush still may have been spot-on about innovation coming along and disrupting the current health insurance business model.

That disruptive innovation is reference-based pricing. This strategy for paying for health care is gaining ground, affecting carriers’ value propositions. It isn’t yet clear whether this reference-based pricing will, as Bush predicted, make insurance companies obsolete, but it could change the face of the health care landscape in the U.S.

What is reference-based pricing?

Reference-based pricing is a new payment model for employer-sponsored benefits plans. Rather than working with a traditional insurance carrier to negotiate price discounts at hospitals, self-funded employers using a reference-based pricing strategy pay hospitals directly, typically in excess of Medicare.

For example, if an employee receives a bill for $20,000, but Medicare would pay $10,000 for the same service, the employer might pay $14,000, and encourage the hospital to accept the payment in full.

To understand why this is so disruptive to insurers, we have to look at how things work now.

Insurance networks

Provider networks are a key part of insurers’ value proposition to employers. In the current health care system, hospital pricing is based around what’s called a chargemaster rate. These prices are not typically shared publicly. Insurance companies negotiate discounts off the chargemaster rate, and pass these discounts on to employers. Insurers compete with each other based on which hospitals are in their “network,” and how significant their discounts are off of the hospital chargemaster prices.

Employers have traditionally been incentivized to select insurers that have broad networks, because patients who visit out-of-network facilities are often charged the full chargemaster rate. But as networks have narrowed and prices continue to rise for both employees and employers, more business leaders are starting to question whether the traditional insurance network discount is meaningful. If you don’t know the amount from which you’re getting a discount, then how can you judge the value?

More employers are finding they can get better value for their health care dollar by negotiating with hospitals directly, and negotiating up from Medicare’s rate, rather than down from the chargemaster price.

By eliminating a key part of the carrier’s value proposition, reference-based pricing represents significant disruption for insurers’ business models.

Where do carriers go from here?

As employers are increasingly demanding more transparency and rationality in health care pricing, insurers are looking for a way forward.

Perhaps recognizing that they will no longer be competing on provider network and group plans alone, carriers like UnitedHealthcare, Humana and Aeta have been rapidly diversifying their service lines by acquiring health care service companies.

For example, witness the acquisition by UnitedHealthcare’s Optum segment of DaVita, and Humana’s recent acquisition of Kindred Healthcare. Carriers are also pursuing retail affiliations—CVS plans to acquire Aetna, and Humana and Walmart are reportedly in talks to partner.

The role of insurers isn’t obsolete, but as employers see less value in networks, carriers will have to compete on different measures. This could prove hard to do. If so, reference-based pricing may turn out to be the disruptive innovation Jonathan Bush was predicting all along.

How a Broken Healthcare System Impacts People’s Lives

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As a Third Party Administrator, employers and plan members count on us to make their health benefits work. While that sounds easy enough, it can be anything but easy when ordinary working families are forced to face exorbitant hospital bills.

One couple recently found themselves confronted with a very difficult situation when their son needed a medical procedure that would be considered routine in ordinary circumstances. However, what happened was anything but ordinary. The hospital rejected the couple’s insurance, saying that because they had gone out of network, they would be required to pay $9,000 up front for their child’s tonsillectomy and another $10,000 or more immediately following the procedure.

Their health plan, which we manage for their employer, has been partially self-funded for several years. In addition, the employer recently replaced their PPO network with reference based (or cost plus) pricing, a strategy that enables the plan to define pricing limits and ensure a much more transparent view of healthcare expenses.

In this particular case, we worked with the parents, their regular pediatrician and ELAP Services to arrange for the procedure to be performed at a local, affiliated surgical center – at a fraction of the price quoted by the original hospital. Their total cost was less than $2,000, approximately one tenth of the cost the original provider intended to charge. It took a great deal of work and cooperation to achieve this outcome, but the case serves as an excellent example of what can be done when a health plan has been designed to encourage open dialogue between patients, trusted advisors and providers.

More and more, hardworking Americans are facing extraordinary healthcare costs and struggling to pay their bills. NerdWallet Health conducted a study and found that a debt collection agency will contact 1 in 5 American adults regarding medical debt. This means there are approximately 51 million people who are unprepared and unable to deal with the rising cost of healthcare.

Another aspect of healthcare that is seldom discussed is the challenge facing small and mid-sized employers struggling to provide adequate healthcare to their workers. Rising costs have made it nearly impossible for many companies to hire new employees or invest in their businesses in other ways. Sadly, millions of Americans have seen their standard of living eroded by the cost shifting that has occurred.

As these parents and their employer have discovered, alternatives like reference based pricing are helping to build bridges between employers and hospitals. “While a good deal of experience is required to design these plans and manage them over time, the opportunity for cost savings is so significant that more and more employers are moving in this direction,” said Brooks Goodison, President of Diversified Group. One of New England’s most experienced Third Party Administrators, Diversified Group has responded to the growing demand. “With or without reference based pricing, Diversified has long been committed to pursuing mutually rewarding partnerships between employers and community-based health care facilities,” added Goodison. “Open communication, cooperation and innovation by businesses and healthcare providers are musts if the issue of runaway healthcare costs is ever going to be resolved.”

As cases like this have long shown, the price for a given healthcare procedure in the same locale can vary greatly, often with little difference in quality. When employers use reference based or cost plus pricing, the plan and area hospitals typically agree on a pricing schedule for covered benefits by using Medicare plus a predetermined margin. Visit Diversified Group online to learn more about reference based pricing and view a brief educational video by ELAP Services, Inc.

The New Year’s Resolution You Should Keep: Managing Your Healthcare Costs

The article below was published on January 3, 2018 by DigitalDealer, written by Contributing Writer Steve Kelly.

Photo Source: DigitalDealer

We came across this article written by Steve Kelly, co-founder and CEO of ELAP Services. It discusses one common theme that all of us at Diversified Group hear more and more from not only our auto dealer clients, but from a growing number of our clients – the fact that amidst increasing healthcare costs, employers are seeking out better, less expensive ways to offer healthcare to their employees. Making the switch from a traditional health insurance plan to self-insurance creates the opportunity to achieve the savings they are looking for. We have been proud to partner with ELAP Services for many years and can attest to the results discussed in his article, which can be read below.

January is the month of new beginnings, and of course, New Year’s resolutions. But beyond setting a personal goal this year, what if you decided to use your energy to set your dealership up for success instead? What if your New Year’s resolution was to finally find a better, less expensive way to offer healthcare to your employees?

Each year auto dealers around the country feel the squeeze of rising healthcare costs. Insurance premiums for family coverage have increased by 55 percent since 2007, and while these costs are felt by the individuals and families on the plan, the employer who sponsors the health plan often carries the financial burden. Meanwhile, the total operating profit for the average dealership decreased 43.5 percent from 2016 to 2017, proving that healthcare costs and profits are out of sync, and healthcare costs have a substantial impact on dealers trying to run profitable businesses.

Becoming fed-up with the increasing costs year over year, more businesses are looking for viable, cost-saving alternatives to PPOs and are increasingly turning to self-funded or self-insured plans. Self-insurance is when an employer takes the money it would pay an insurance company and instead pays healthcare providers directly for medical claims.

According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute, the number of businesses offering self-insured health plans has increased by nearly 37 percent from 1996 to 2015. This huge increase proves that employers are trying to find the right, less expensive healthcare solution for their business. But, if you are considering self-insurance to forgo the hassles and costs of a PPO, you are missing the key component to assisting with risks of self-insurance. Self-insurers can really only maximize their health plans when paired with the reference-based pricing method.

The reference-based pricing method is the assessment and payment of medical claims based on the provider’s actual cost to deliver the service or by utilizing Medicare cost data as a benchmark. This means that rather than paying a discount off of an unknown price, an employer knows the true cost and pays a fair price for the service. Reference-based pricing helps remove the curtain of PPO “discounts,” leaving you with a fair and reasonable price to pay for a medical service.

Quite frankly, changing from a traditional healthcare plan to self-insurance with reference-based pricing could be a total game changer for your dealership. Self-insurers who use reference-based pricing benefit from significant cost savings in comparison to their PPO discounts. With the help of a partner, employers pay their healthcare bills going line by line through the expenses and with an understanding of the actual cost it takes to provide a medical service, like they would any other business cost—and in the way healthcare was meant to be paid for. On average, with the right strategic partner, you can expect to save up to 30 percent off your total healthcare spend in the first year.

So, this year, rather than throwing in the towel a few weeks in, like we often do for New Year’s resolutions, resolve to empower yourself by learning the facts and evaluating if your current healthcare plan is truly offering you the value it promises. Identifying a better, less expensive way to offer healthcare to your employees will allow you to do something novel like put the savings back into running your dealership.

About the Author

Steve Kelly is the co-founder and CEO of ELAP Services, a leading healthcare solution for self-funded employers across the U.S. He is a recognized expert and frequently called-upon speaker in the insurance, employee benefits and risk management industry, bringing more than three decades of experience solving his clients’ complex healthcare challenges.

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Responding to Growing Demand for Transparency

Experts agree that a lack of true price transparency has contributed significantly to the inefficiency in healthcare. Several websites compare the costs for certain procedures at varying hospitals, but it’s still very difficult, if not impossible, to make an informed choice when preparing for a non-emergency procedure. As a result, most people still go to doctors participating in a covered network and follow physician referrals when a specialist is required. In most cases, these choices are made without any knowledge of the cost.

Powerful Mobile Technology

Today, leading TPAs are providing self-funded health plan members with a variety of very powerful mobile transparency tools. One new mobile app enables members to identify fair pricing for more than 200 common procedures, including surgeries, imaging and diagnostic testing. By linking a rewards program, the app awards financial incentives when high quality, competitively priced providers are selected over those with lesser ratings.

Another software maker that describes a third of healthcare procedures as “shoppable”, has introduced a mobile app that enables plan members to search for physicians by procedure, location and price. This tool even goes beyond facts and figures to provide detailed descriptions of the procedure being searched. When members need further assistance, care navigators are available to provide online support via a live chat option.

Expert Administration Still Matters

While a totally open pricing system may never be possible in a business as complex as healthcare, TPAs are making self-funded health plans more transparent all the time. Strategies such as Reference Based Pricing and Concierge Health Advocacy are having a tremendous impact on cost and employee engagement. And while insurance carriers typically withhold claims data from fully insured groups, TPAs are experts at helping their clients put valuable claims data to work to identify cost drivers and manage chronic conditions in ways that help the plan avoid catastrophic claims in the future.

As the transition from volume to value-based healthcare continues, more responsibility will land in the hands of plan members. Smart employers know that a well-designed health plan can foster positive change and lower costs only if members understand their benefits. As long as self-funded plans, highly personal service and creative ideas are allowed to flourish, the number of engaged consumers capable of making economically wise healthcare decisions will continue to grow.

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Montana Adopts Reference Based Pricing Strategies

Article as seen on July 15th, 2016 in blog.riskmanagers.us.

Montana adopts reference based pricing model for state employees. Will other states follow?

Montana says health plan contracts will save $25 million

From Tribune reports 3:27 p.m. MDT July 8, 2016

Montana will save more than $25 million by the end of 2018 through changes to the state of Montana’s health care plan, Gov. Steve Bullock said.

“This change will save taxpayers and employees money, which means more money in the hands of hardworking Montanans being spent on Main Streets all across the state,” Bullock said. “As the largest state employer, it is critical that the state of Montana leads the way in managing rising health care costs and do so in a fiscally responsible way.”

The state of Montana is implementing transparent pricing, a new way of paying state medical costs, based on paying a multiple above what Medicare pays for health care services.

GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE

Benefis and Montana insurance plan contract talks fail

“Until we manage health care costs, they will continue to eat away at employee salaries and family budgets,” said Sheila Hogan, director of the Department of Administration. “This change will put money into the pockets of our employees for everyday needs.”

Contract talks with Benefis Health System in Great Falls failed and Benefis is the only one of the top 10 health care providers in Montana that is not participating in the state health plan program.

Under the former model of payment, hospitals and facilities could charge the state’s health plan dramatically different amounts for the same service. For example, a hospital in Montana could charge $25,000 for equivalent knee replacement surgery, while another charged more than $100,000. The new form of reimbursing hospitals changes that model. Allegiance is contracting with facilities for more comparable costs by anchoring pricing to a national point of reference, Medicare, then paying hospitals a multiple above that. This will make medical costs more predictable, consistent and comparable among facilities.

“This change in reimbursement method is game-changing for the state of Montana,” said Ron Dewsnup, president and general manager of Allegiance.

Transparent pricing is one of the upcoming efforts by the state’s Health Care and Benefits Division to manage health care costs. An additional resource, Healthcare Bluebook, will be available through Allegiance later this summer, which allows members to compare medical price ranges and quality.

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Interest in Reference-Based Pricing Grows

Reference-based pricing (RFB) strategies are increasing in popularity as employers seek more affordable options for their health benefit plans. Although PPO networks and their negotiated discount agreements have been in place for decades, they provide very little transparency to the true costs of services provided.

How can an employer control health care costs when the base charges for services for the same procedures can vary dramatically between physicians and hospitals in the same region? For example, depending upon which hospitals is providing the service, hip surgery can cost anywhere from $20,000 to $100,000 (all incorporating PPO discounts).

Reference-based pricing is a strategy that drives plan enrollees to find and use a provider (usually a hospital) that has agreed to accept a fixed amount for certain procedures. These amounts can be directly negotiated with providers using the average fees charged within the same geographic region by providers of similar training and experience or, more often, calculated as a percentage over and above current Medicare reimbursement rates.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is comfortable with this new approach, as it provides much greater transparency to the true cost of services – with the caveat that care must be taken to ensure plan participants are provided with “adequate access to quality providers” and are not just forced to choose the least costly alternative.

A Perfect Complement to Self-Funding

Self-funded plans are particularly well-suited to this approach and many TPAs are already offering their clients alternatives that incorporate some form of reference-based pricing. With experienced plan administrators guiding the implementation and administration, self-funded employer groups can finally know the true cost of care – something that few fully-insured organizations have ever been able to identify.

Although there is a concern that plan participants may be “balance billed” – charged the different between the provider’s retail or network pricing and what they are being paid under the RBP agreement – some TPAs take steps to ensure plan members are protected against this.

Far outweighing these considerations is the potential for savings. It is not uncommon for reference-based pricing to yield savings in the range of $150,000 for every 100 covered employees. To learn more about reference-based pricing alternatives, contact Diversified Group today.

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