UnitedHealth will begin passing drug discounts to plan participants

This article was published on March 13, 2019 on BenefitsPro written by Max Nisen.

The health-care policy environment is shifting in a dangerous way for insurance giants. A seemingly small change in how drugs are paid for could be the beginning of a response.

UnitedHealth Group Inc., the largest U.S. health insurer, announced Tuesday that its pharmacy-benefit management arm OptumRX will mandate that all new employer health-plan clients pass the drug discounts it obtains for them directly to plan participants. That’s a big shift from the current system, under which OptumRX and other PBMs negotiate prices with drugmakers and hand the resulting rebate checks to clients to use as they wish. PBMs profit from this arrangement, and have an incentive to favor heavily rebated drugs. That pushes drugmakers to hike prices, and patients are exposed to artificially inflated costs.

UnitedHealth’s new policy means lower drug costs for more people. But it has broader implications. It smartly preempts Trump administration efforts to reform rebates, and shows that the industry can make needed changes ahead of pushes for an even bigger government-led overhaul of the way they do business.

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Increasing costs and unhappiness with the status quo are motivating the administration’s regulatory effort to end rebates in Medicare. It is also thinking about forcing insurers to reveal the hidden prices they negotiate with hospitals, which would wreak havoc on their ability to negotiate. Consumer dissatisfaction also behind broader reform efforts championed by Democrats, such as Medicare for All. Such plans are distant threats, but they are present and existential enough to weigh on shares.

Making the switch to so-called point-of-sale rebates for new clients is a big and unique step for UnitedHealth, and it builds on its January transition of a different subset of its business. While the impact will be small at first as existing clients can stick to the old system, the new model could eventually impact as many as 18 million Americans, according to a research note from Royal Bank of Canada analyst Frank Morgan.

UnitedHealth says people already on its point-of-sale plans save an average of $130 per eligible prescription and that medication adherence is up by as much as 16 percent. People are happier and healthier when they can afford to take their medicine, and are more likely to avoid larger medical costs down the line.

If the administration’s efforts on rebates succeed, UnitedHealth will face less disruption and have more experience in making a new business model work. Slower rivals such as CVS Health Inc. and Cigna Inc’s Express Scripts – which offer point-of-sale rebates as an option but don’t mandate it – may suffer. Already in February, CVS attributed part of its weak 2019 guidance to the impact of shifting drug-pricing trends on its PBM as drugmakers held back on price hikes under political scrutiny.

Plans that offer point-of-sale rebates have a chance to focus more on reducing overall costs for both patients and payers, especially when integrated with an insurance plan. This isn’t going to make insurers and PBMs beloved overnight, or produce instant systemic cost-savings. But UnitedHealth is taking a needed and bigger step toward a better and more patient-friendly system.

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Transparency in healthcare: The case for an employer bill of rights

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This article was published on January 31, 2019 on Employee Benefit News, written by Steve Kelly.

Today more than ever before, benefits and human resources professionals are struggling to provide their teams with quality coverage at affordable rates. Costs have skyrocketed for the more than 150 million Americans who receive healthcare coverage through their workplace — more than doubling since 2008, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Private health spending by businesses has steadily grown year after year and accounts for 20% of the $3.3 trillion of total health spending in the U.S. Businesses are finding that they can’t afford to wait any longer. They need to take control of their healthcare costs and seek resources to make changes to the plans they currently offer.

With the complexities surrounding the decision-making process for benefits programs, businesses often feel unaware, or worse yet, misled when it comes to their foundational rights regarding health plans.

Enter the Employer Bill of Rights — an initiative to help business owners empower themselves to learn and exercise the basic rights often overlooked in today’s healthcare system and take an activist role as they investigate and select healthcare options.

Knowledge is power

The employer bill of rights is rooted in the mission that every business owner needs to take responsibility for providing the best possible benefits program to their employees. Businesses can utilize the employer bill of rights as a tool and learn how to pay for healthcare like any other business expense.

With the employer bill of rights, employers are empowered to:

1. Pay a fair amount for healthcare.
Healthcare costs are often the second largest operating expense after employee wages. Employers do not have to accept the status quo for their health plan and pay significantly inflated medical expenses.

2. Know what healthcare services actually cost.
A traditional PPO health plan typically leaves the employer in the dark about how plan parameters were set by the insurer and medical provider. Businesses have a right to know the cost of medical services.

3. Audit medical bills.
Billing mistakes and inflation of medical charges are common. Businesses and individuals have a right to carefully evaluate healthcare expenses. A line-by-line auditing of medical bills helps ensure the charges are accurate and fair.

4. Explore your health plan options.
By partnering with an informed and experienced healthcare consultant, employers can discover health plan options beyond the traditional PPO model. A self-funded health plan, where employers pay for medical claims as services are rendered instead of providing ongoing and advanced payments to an insurance company, can take employers on the path toward more control over healthcare spending.

Self-funding is on the rise, with the number of businesses deciding to self-insure increasing by nearly $37 between 1996 and 2015, according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute.

5. Offer your employees a comprehensive and affordable benefits program.
Employees count on their employer-sponsored health plans to be reliable and financially feasible. Employers have a right to offer healthcare solutions that minimize the financial burden on the plan member.

6. Design a health plan to meet your unique needs.
The best health plans are well-rounded and flexible. Employers have the right to customize their health plan to determine the approach that best suits the needs of their business and team. Unlike traditional health plans, self-funded plans are customizable.

7. Defend the best interests of your business and your employees when paying for healthcare.
Surprise medical bills and inflated prices are common, but healthcare finances do not have to be handled alone. Employers and individuals have the right to access advocacy services that support fair and reasonable healthcare payments and help employers meet their fiduciary responsibility.

8. Make direct connections with providers and health systems.
Fair outcomes can be achieved when people work together. By creating direct partnerships with providers and health systems in their communities, employers can become good stewards of healthcare by building bridges and driving quality healthcare experiences for all.

The path to activism

Change in healthcare is possible when businesses take charge and challenge the status quo. As we continue to see the rise of self-funded health plans, the growth of reference-based, or metric-based, pricing is following suit.

The reference-based pricing approach starts at the bottom with an actual cost amount, then adds a fair profit margin to calculate a total cost of service. Simply stated, it allows employers to utilize rational limits of payment to medical providers instead of relying on the traditional PPO model.

Businesses can be activists for change by standing up against out-of-control healthcare costs, and they can start by adopting the employer bill of rights and investigating reference-based pricing. By innovating their healthcare solutions and turning away from insurance plans which have failed to adapt to the changing healthcare landscape, business owners have the opportunity to improve the health plans they offer their employees, transform their bottom line and help spark reform for businesses across the country.

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Who says your health plan has to cost 5% more every year?

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Done right, self-funding provides the flexibility needed to control costs.

A 2018 Kaiser Employer Survey showed that the cost of employer-based, family coverage rose to $19,616, an increase of 5 percent from the prior year. While this increase may be considered moderate or acceptable by many employers, we work hard to help our self-funded clients raise the bar (or in this case lower the bar).

In contrast to fully-insured plans, partial self-funding gives employers the freedom to write their own plan document. This enables our clients to adopt a totally different mindset – a “take charge” attitude that not only allows a plan to meet employees’ needs but encourages members to do what they can to keep costs in check.

After focusing on plan design and cost management, we turn our attention to claims data. While others may be quick to pay claims, we help clients look closely at claim costs each month. We use the data to identify trends, treatment patterns or chronic conditions that have the potential to result in a high dollar claim. When we see something that raises a red flag, we go to work on it immediately, looking for ways to minimize costs while striving to achieve the best possible outcome.

The bottom line is that sitting back and hoping that healthcare costs won’t increase next year will not accomplish a thing. Managing the rising cost of healthcare takes know-how, expert administration and the ability to act when cost saving opportunities surface. These are the things we do for our clients each and every day. To raise the bar for your health plan, give us a call at your convenience.

Tell Us How You Feel!

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IRS Publishes PCOR Fees through September 2019

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund fee is a fee on issuers of health insurance policies and plan sponsors of self-insured health plans that helps to fund the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), which was established by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The institute assists, through research, patients, clinicians, purchasers and policy-makers, in making informed health decisions by advancing the quality and relevance of evidence-based medicine. The institute compiles and distributes comparative clinical effectiveness research findings. Under the ACA, all medical plans are responsible for paying the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research fee to the IRS, based on the number of plan participants. If the plan is insured, the insurance carrier pays the fee on behalf of the policyholder. If the plan is self-insured, the employer/plan sponsor must file the Form 720 for the second quarter and pay the fee to the IRS directly.

The IRS recently published its PCOR fee for policy and plan years ending January through September 2019 and the applicable dollar amount is $2.45, which is multiplied by the number of covered lives determined for the appropriate period.

The PCOR program will sunset in 2019. The last payment will apply to plan years that end by September 30, 2019 and that payment will be due in July 2020. There will not be any PCOR fee for plan years that end on October 1, 2019 or later.

The PCOR fee is paid by the health insurer for fully insured plans. All self-insured medical plans, including health FSAs and HRAs must pay the fee unless they are considered an excepted benefit:

    • A health FSA is an excepted-benefit as long as the employer does not contribute more than $500/year to the accounts and offers another medical plan with non-excepted benefits.
    • An HRA is an excepted-benefit if it only reimburses for excepted-benefits (e.g., limited-scope dental and vision expenses or long-term care coverage) and is not integrated with the group medical plan.

The PCOR fee is calculated off the average number of lives covered during the policy year. That means that all parties enrolled will have to be accounted for such as dependents, spouses, retirees, and COBRA beneficiaries. Depending on when the plan starts and ends also can determine the fee per form. Participating employees and dependents are counted as covered lives. For HRA and health FSA plans, just count each participating employee as a covered life.

Clients who have elected to have Diversified Group assist with the PCOR fee calculation can expect an email in June 2019 which will include a copy of the completed Form 720 and a PCOR calculation worksheet with supporting documentation. For the current year, clients will need to file the Form 720 by July 31, 2019.

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Are Your Plan Members Sharing in Your Plan Savings?

A little skin in the game can make a big difference.

At our recent “Let’s Take Control” themed Solutions Day, Adam Russo of the Phia Group shared his story that earned front page coverage in the Boston Globe. He told the audience about a tactic Diversified Group has helped many employer groups implement over the years – sharing plan savings with employees who are willing to shop for high quality, lower cost providers.

As Adam illustrated, employees of Phia Group who do their part to lower costs receive 20% of the plan savings. A member who saves the plan $5,000 on the cost of an MRI receives $1,000. And that’s just one example – their plan places no limit on the amount of savings it will give back to a covered member.

Diversified helps many self-funded employer groups craft their plan document to include member incentives. Waiving copays on generic drugs and urgent care visits is an easy option to implement. Another powerful step is to reward plan members who speak with HR before arranging for a costly healthcare procedure such as surgery. Not only will this engage members and open their eyes to available savings, but it can often create an opportunity to better manage or perhaps even avoid a large claim in the future.

Incentivizing members is just one of the ways we’re helping employers “take control” of rising healthcare costs. To learn more about this and other solutions made possible by self-funding, give us a call at your convenience.

Tell Us How You Feel!

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IRS Releases Adjusted PCOR Fee

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund fee is a fee on issuers of health insurance policies and plan sponsors of self-insured health plans that helps to fund the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), which was established by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The institute assists, through research, patients, clinicians, purchasers and policy-makers, in making health decisions by advancing the quality of evidence-based medicine. The institute compiles and distributes comparative clinical effectiveness research findings. Under the ACA, all medical plans are responsible for paying the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research fee to the IRS, based on the number of plan participants. If the plan is fully-insured, the insurance carrier pays the fee on behalf of the policyholder. If the plan is self-insured, the employer/plan sponsor must file the Form 720 for the second quarter and pay the fee to the IRS directly.

The IRS recently published its PCOR fee for policy and plan years ending:  January through September 2018 the applicable dollar amount is $2.39, which is multiplied by the number of covered lives determined for the appropriate period. For policy and plan years ending October through December 2018, the applicable dollar amount is $2.45.

All self-insured medical plans, including health FSAs and HRAs must pay the fee unless they are considered an excepted-benefit:

  • A health FSA is an excepted-benefit as long as the employer does not contribute more than $500/year to the accounts and offers another medical plan with non-excepted benefits.
  • An HRA is an excepted-benefit if it only reimburses for excepted-benefits (e.g., limited-scope dental and vision expenses or long-term care coverage) and is not integrated with the group medical plan.

The PCORI fee is calculated off the average number of lives covered during the policy year. That means that all parties enrolled will have to be accounted for such as dependents, spouses, retirees, and COBRA beneficiaries. For HRA and health FSA plans, just count each participating employee as a covered life.

Payment of the PCOR fee for the calendar 2018 plan year — the last year the fee applies — will be due by July 31, 2019 (payments may extend into 2020 for non-calendar-year plans).

Clients who have elected to have Diversified Group assist with the PCOR fee calculation can expect an email in June 2019, which will include a copy of the completed Form 720 and a PCOR calculation worksheet with supporting documentation. Clients will need to file the Form 720 by July 31, 2019.

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