Who says your health plan has to cost 5% more every year?

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Done right, self-funding provides the flexibility needed to control costs.

A 2018 Kaiser Employer Survey showed that the cost of employer-based, family coverage rose to $19,616, an increase of 5 percent from the prior year. While this increase may be considered moderate or acceptable by many employers, we work hard to help our self-funded clients raise the bar (or in this case lower the bar).

In contrast to fully-insured plans, partial self-funding gives employers the freedom to write their own plan document. This enables our clients to adopt a totally different mindset – a “take charge” attitude that not only allows a plan to meet employees’ needs but encourages members to do what they can to keep costs in check.

After focusing on plan design and cost management, we turn our attention to claims data. While others may be quick to pay claims, we help clients look closely at claim costs each month. We use the data to identify trends, treatment patterns or chronic conditions that have the potential to result in a high dollar claim. When we see something that raises a red flag, we go to work on it immediately, looking for ways to minimize costs while striving to achieve the best possible outcome.

The bottom line is that sitting back and hoping that healthcare costs won’t increase next year will not accomplish a thing. Managing the rising cost of healthcare takes know-how, expert administration and the ability to act when cost saving opportunities surface. These are the things we do for our clients each and every day. To raise the bar for your health plan, give us a call at your convenience.

Tell Us How You Feel!

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IRS Publishes PCOR Fees through September 2019

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund fee is a fee on issuers of health insurance policies and plan sponsors of self-insured health plans that helps to fund the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), which was established by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The institute assists, through research, patients, clinicians, purchasers and policy-makers, in making informed health decisions by advancing the quality and relevance of evidence-based medicine. The institute compiles and distributes comparative clinical effectiveness research findings. Under the ACA, all medical plans are responsible for paying the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research fee to the IRS, based on the number of plan participants. If the plan is insured, the insurance carrier pays the fee on behalf of the policyholder. If the plan is self-insured, the employer/plan sponsor must file the Form 720 for the second quarter and pay the fee to the IRS directly.

The IRS recently published its PCOR fee for policy and plan years ending January through September 2019 and the applicable dollar amount is $2.45, which is multiplied by the number of covered lives determined for the appropriate period.

The PCOR program will sunset in 2019. The last payment will apply to plan years that end by September 30, 2019 and that payment will be due in July 2020. There will not be any PCOR fee for plan years that end on October 1, 2019 or later.

The PCOR fee is paid by the health insurer for fully insured plans. All self-insured medical plans, including health FSAs and HRAs must pay the fee unless they are considered an excepted benefit:

    • A health FSA is an excepted-benefit as long as the employer does not contribute more than $500/year to the accounts and offers another medical plan with non-excepted benefits.
    • An HRA is an excepted-benefit if it only reimburses for excepted-benefits (e.g., limited-scope dental and vision expenses or long-term care coverage) and is not integrated with the group medical plan.

The PCOR fee is calculated off the average number of lives covered during the policy year. That means that all parties enrolled will have to be accounted for such as dependents, spouses, retirees, and COBRA beneficiaries. Depending on when the plan starts and ends also can determine the fee per form. Participating employees and dependents are counted as covered lives. For HRA and health FSA plans, just count each participating employee as a covered life.

Clients who have elected to have Diversified Group assist with the PCOR fee calculation can expect an email in June 2019 which will include a copy of the completed Form 720 and a PCOR calculation worksheet with supporting documentation. For the current year, clients will need to file the Form 720 by July 31, 2019.

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Are Your Plan Members Sharing in Your Plan Savings?

A little skin in the game can make a big difference.

At our recent “Let’s Take Control” themed Solutions Day, Adam Russo of the Phia Group shared his story that earned front page coverage in the Boston Globe. He told the audience about a tactic Diversified Group has helped many employer groups implement over the years – sharing plan savings with employees who are willing to shop for high quality, lower cost providers.

As Adam illustrated, employees of Phia Group who do their part to lower costs receive 20% of the plan savings. A member who saves the plan $5,000 on the cost of an MRI receives $1,000. And that’s just one example – their plan places no limit on the amount of savings it will give back to a covered member.

Diversified helps many self-funded employer groups craft their plan document to include member incentives. Waiving copays on generic drugs and urgent care visits is an easy option to implement. Another powerful step is to reward plan members who speak with HR before arranging for a costly healthcare procedure such as surgery. Not only will this engage members and open their eyes to available savings, but it can often create an opportunity to better manage or perhaps even avoid a large claim in the future.

Incentivizing members is just one of the ways we’re helping employers “take control” of rising healthcare costs. To learn more about this and other solutions made possible by self-funding, give us a call at your convenience.

Tell Us How You Feel!

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IRS Releases Adjusted PCOR Fee

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund fee is a fee on issuers of health insurance policies and plan sponsors of self-insured health plans that helps to fund the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), which was established by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The institute assists, through research, patients, clinicians, purchasers and policy-makers, in making health decisions by advancing the quality of evidence-based medicine. The institute compiles and distributes comparative clinical effectiveness research findings. Under the ACA, all medical plans are responsible for paying the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research fee to the IRS, based on the number of plan participants. If the plan is fully-insured, the insurance carrier pays the fee on behalf of the policyholder. If the plan is self-insured, the employer/plan sponsor must file the Form 720 for the second quarter and pay the fee to the IRS directly.

The IRS recently published its PCOR fee for policy and plan years ending:  January through September 2018 the applicable dollar amount is $2.39, which is multiplied by the number of covered lives determined for the appropriate period. For policy and plan years ending October through December 2018, the applicable dollar amount is $2.45.

All self-insured medical plans, including health FSAs and HRAs must pay the fee unless they are considered an excepted-benefit:

  • A health FSA is an excepted-benefit as long as the employer does not contribute more than $500/year to the accounts and offers another medical plan with non-excepted benefits.
  • An HRA is an excepted-benefit if it only reimburses for excepted-benefits (e.g., limited-scope dental and vision expenses or long-term care coverage) and is not integrated with the group medical plan.

The PCORI fee is calculated off the average number of lives covered during the policy year. That means that all parties enrolled will have to be accounted for such as dependents, spouses, retirees, and COBRA beneficiaries. For HRA and health FSA plans, just count each participating employee as a covered life.

Payment of the PCOR fee for the calendar 2018 plan year — the last year the fee applies — will be due by July 31, 2019 (payments may extend into 2020 for non-calendar-year plans).

Clients who have elected to have Diversified Group assist with the PCOR fee calculation can expect an email in June 2019, which will include a copy of the completed Form 720 and a PCOR calculation worksheet with supporting documentation. Clients will need to file the Form 720 by July 31, 2019.

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3 reasons self-funding is a great option for smaller companies

This article was published on September 10, 2018 on BenefitsPro, written by Darick Bradford.

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Source: BenefitsPro

“Wait, what’s a self-funded plan again? And why does it make sense for my clients?”

These are questions I hear from brokers all the time. And I get it. Self-funding can be complex. But it’s time to get smarter about self-funded health benefit plan designs as this type of product could be a game-changer for your smaller clients.

Let’s start with the basics. What is a self-funded plan? Self-funding is an arrangement where an employer sponsors a self-funded health benefit plan and is financially responsible for employee covered claims up to a certain dollar amount. Covered claims in excess of this dollar amount are reimbursed to the employer through stop-loss insurance.

Larger organizations have used self-funding for years as a way to save costs, but more recently we’re also seeing smaller businesses offering self-funded health benefit plans to their employees.

The numbers back it up. Between 2013 and 2016, the percentage of small employers offering at least one self-funded health benefit plan increased from 13.3 percent to 17.4 percent—a 31 percent increase.

Why are more small businesses offering self-funded health benefit plans? I see three big reasons:

1: Self-funding can be a great tool to attract and retain employees.

When it comes to health care, employees want choice and affordable options. Self-funded health benefit plans can give your employees both. From comprehensive medical to preventive-only coverage, your employees will have a variety of options. And, they’ll have those choices at affordable prices. That can be a key tool to attracting and retaining employees in an increasingly tight labor market.

2: Self-funding provides flexibility.

Employers can customize their self-funded health benefit plans with different deductibles and coinsurance choices to fit their needs, whether it’s a preferred provider organization (PPO) plan design, consumer-directed health plan (CDHP) design, or a reference-based pricing or preventive-only plan design.

3: Self-funding can help lower employer costs.

There are a variety of ways self-funded health benefit plans can help employers lower costs. First, employers can receive refunds if there is a surplus of claim dollars in their prefund account at the end of the plan year. Second, claim dollars are not subject to state health insurance premium taxes, which can help lower costs (premium taxes average around 2 percent). And finally, self-funded health benefit plans give employers access to aggregate health claims data and demographic information. This data — available exclusively under a self-funded arrangement versus traditional health insurance — allows employers to better manage costs and encourage cost-savings measures their employees can practice, such as switching to generic medications, using in-network providers, and selecting a different level of care.

In the end, better understanding the ins and outs of self-funding will mean more choices for your small employer clients—and more success for you.

With some research and education on how self-funding works and the carriers/TPAs that offer administrative services, self-funded health benefit plan designs and stop-loss insurance, you can become well-versed in what’s available in the marketplace and learn if and when a self-funded health benefit plan design could be a potential fit for your smaller clients. Having a solid knowledge is a good start to have the advantage over another broker who didn’t evaluate self-funding as a viable option.

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Who Owns Your Claims Data?

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You Can’t Manage What You Don’t Measure!

With a self-funded healthcare plan and a good, independent TPA, access to claims data is standard operating procedure. Even more important, a good TPA like Diversified Group has the expertise to convert your data into intelligent, actionable strategies to manage your plan, monitor performance and modify plan design to control costs.

In contrast, employers with fully insured health plans seldom see their claims data. Even self-funded plans managed by large carrier-owned ASO divisions are often unable to receive claims data on a regular basis.

Analyzing claims data with state-of-the-art tools helps identify, analyze and manage potentially high dollar claims. This capability alone saves many of our clients more than 20% annually. Hospital stays can be monitored, claim costs can be unbundled to detect fraud and abuse and discounts can be negotiated without compromising the quality of care received. Even the rising cost of specialty (bio-tech) pharmaceuticals can be managed when risks are identified early on.

If you’re not receiving claims data and analysis, you’re operating in the dark and it’s time you had a conversation with your broker or TPA. After self-funding your health plan, we consider analyzing claims data to be “Cost Control 101”!

Tell Us How You Feel!

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How Much Is Fraud & Abuse Costing Your Health Plan?

newspaper-headlinesFrom a drug manufacturer that contributes money to a non-profit Copay Assistance foundation and then steers Medicare patients taking their drugs to that foundation to a diagnostic lab that pays doctors for every blood test they refer, disguising the payments as “processing and handling fees”, there seems to be no end to the costly schemes plaguing our healthcare system. What is an employer group to do?

For starters, use partial self-funding to provide health benefits to your workers – even if your group is small. It’s the only way to know where your health plan dollars are going from month to month and year to year. Choose an independent TPA to design your plan, manage costs and advocate for your members. This way, you and your plan will have a dedicated, experienced team looking out for your best interests, rather than those of a provider or a large health plan (who may both be part of the same organization).

We can’t keep fraud and abuse out of the healthcare system. But by paying claims in strict accordance with your plan document, providing special handling for members with a serious condition or chronic illness, and helping your members choose high quality, high value providers, we can do everything in our power to keep it from impacting your health plan directly.

Tell Us How You Feel!

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